On déménage / We’re moving

décembre 23, 2009

—> liturgieapocryphe.com

Jesus Loves Stuff

décembre 14, 2009

www.jesuslovesstuff.com

Merci Mivil Deschênes

Until the Light Takes Us

décembre 9, 2009

‘In 1991, Norwegian churches started to burn down, just after an underground circle of metal musicians had formed. The film reveals the true story behind the music, murders, and church burnings, and shows what happened to these young men, who tried to change the world using music, art, and violence. Ultimately, they lost control of what they had created.’

www.blackmetalmovie.com

Olivier Messiaen « Louange à l’éternité de Jésus »

décembre 8, 2009

« Isolated Magick » par « French » (Richard Sayer)

décembre 5, 2009

« French » (Richard Sayer) :

‘I’ve made a full color 16 page zine to go with my Exhibition…. they’ll be on sale from Chapter One Gallery and also from my online store from Thursday’.

Extrait de ‘Visa de Censure n°X’ de Pierre Clémenti

décembre 4, 2009

Pierre Clémenti (Wiki)

Expo ‘Sacrement’ 2009, Mtl, p.Q

décembre 1, 2009

Re-post du blog d’Annie-Ève Dumontier :

Invocation Of My Demon Brother (Kenneth Anger, 1969)

novembre 26, 2009

*Starring: Anton LeVey as Satan
*Original Music Score : Mick Jagger

WIKI

Sacrement, Montréal …

novembre 26, 2009

Le 19 novembre dernier – devançant de deux jours l’invitation du Pape à persévérer dans ‘l’Art lumineux’ -  se tenait le ‘vernissage’ de l’exposition ‘Sacrement’, édition MMIX (cette fois en sol montréalais).

Photos à venir.

 

Pope Benedict XVI Meets with Artists in Sistine Chapel

novembre 25, 2009

Pope Benedict XVI on Saturday met with hundreds of artists, speaking about the role of beauty in today’s world.

‘Je suis heureux de saluer tous les artistes présents. Chers amis, je vous encourage à découvrir et à exprimer toujours mieux, à travers la beauté de vos œuvres, le mystère de Dieu et le mystère de l’homme. Que Dieu vous bénisse!’

Meeting with Artists
Saturday, 21 November 2009

Dear Cardinals,
Brother Bishops and Priests,
Distinguished Artists,
Ladies and Gentlemen,

With great joy I welcome you to this solemn place, so rich in art and in history. I cordially greet each and every one of you and I thank you for accepting my invitation. At this gathering I wish to express and renew the Church’s friendship with the world of art, a friendship that has been strengthened over time; indeed Christianity from its earliest days has recognized the value of the arts and has made wise use of their varied language to express her unvarying message of salvation. This friendship must be continually promoted and supported so that it may be authentic and fruitful, adapted to different historical periods and attentive to social and cultural variations. Indeed, this is the reason for our meeting here today.

Today’s event is focused on you, dear and illustrious artists, from different countries, cultures and religions, some of you perhaps remote from the practice of religion, but interested nevertheless in maintaining communication with the Catholic Church, in not reducing the horizons of existence to mere material realities, to a reductive and trivializing vision. You represent the varied world of the arts and so, through you, I would like to convey to all artists my invitation to friendship, dialogue and cooperation.

Some significant anniversaries occur around this time. It is ten years since the Letter to Artists by my venerable Predecessor, the Servant of God Pope John Paul II. For the first time, on the eve of the Great Jubilee of the Year 2000, the Pope, who was an artist himself, wrote a Letter to artists, combining the solemnity of a pontifical document with the friendly tone of a conversation among all who, as we read in the initial salutation, “are passionately dedicated to the search for new ‘epiphanies’ of beauty”. Twenty-five years ago the same Pope proclaimed Blessed Fra Angelico the patron of artists, presenting him as a model of perfect harmony between faith and art. I also recall how on 7 May 1964, forty-five years ago, in this very place, an historic event took place, at the express wish of Pope Paul VI, to confirm the friendship between the Church and the arts.

The words that he spoke on that occasion resound once more today under the vault of the Sistine Chapel and touch our hearts and our minds. “We need you,” he said. “We need your collaboration in order to carry out our ministry, which consists, as you know, in preaching and rendering accessible and comprehensible to the minds and hearts of our people the things of the spirit, the invisible, the ineffable, the things of God himself. And in this activity … you are masters. It is your task, your mission, and your art consists in grasping treasures from the heavenly realm of the spirit and clothing them in words, colours, forms – making them accessible.” So great was Paul VI’s esteem for artists that he was moved to use daring expressions. “And if we were deprived of your assistance,” he added, “our ministry would become faltering and uncertain, and a special effort would be needed, one might say, to make it artistic, even prophetic. In order to scale the heights of lyrical expression of intuitive beauty, priesthood would have to coincide with art.” On that occasion Paul VI made a commitment to “re-establish the friendship between the Church and artists”, and he invited artists to make a similar, shared commitment, analyzing seriously and objectively the factors that disturbed this relationship, and assuming individual responsibility, courageously and passionately, for a newer and deeper journey in mutual acquaintance and dialogue in order to arrive at an authentic “renaissance” of art in the context of a new humanism.

Full Text of Pope Benedict XVI’s Address to Artists

Merci Émilie Nguyen


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